The effectiveness of semantic aspect of language on reading comprehension in a 4-year-old child with autistic spectrum disorder and hyperlexia

  • Atusa Rabiee Mail Section of Speech therapy, Roozbeh Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Zahra Shahrivar Section of Speech therapy, Roozbeh Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
Keywords:
Autistic disorder, reading, understanding, semantics

Abstract

Background: Hyperlexia is a super ability demonstrated by a very specific group of individuals with developmental disorders. This term is used to describe the children with high ability in word recognition, but low reading comprehension skills, despite the problems in language, cognitive and social skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of improving the semantic aspect of language (increase in understanding and expression vocabulary) on reading comprehension in an autistic child with hyperlexia.
Case: The child studied in this research was an autistic child with hyperlexia. At the beginning of this study he was 3 years and 11 months old. He could read, but his reading comprehension was low. In a period of 12 therapy session, understanding and expression of 160 words was taught to child. During this period, the written form of words was eliminated. After these sessions, the reading comprehension was re-assessed for the words that child could understand and express.
Conclusion: Improving semantic aspect of language (understanding and expression of vocabulary) increase reading comprehension of written words.

References

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Published
2017-07-31
How to Cite
1.
Rabiee A, Shahrivar Z. The effectiveness of semantic aspect of language on reading comprehension in a 4-year-old child with autistic spectrum disorder and hyperlexia. Aud Vestib Res. 21(4):94-100.
Section
Case Report(s)