Detection of cut-off point for rapid automized naming test in good readers and dyslexics

  • Zahra Soleymani Mail Department of Speech therapy, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Parvin Nemati Department of Speech therapy, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Azam Barkhordar Department of Speech therapy, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
  • Ahmadreza Baghestani Department of Biostatistics, Islamic Azad University-South Tehran Branch, Tehran, Iran
Keywords:
Rapid automized naming, cut-off point, dyslexia, sensitivity, specificity

Abstract

Background and Aim: Rapid automized naming test is an appropriate tool to diagnose learning disability even before teaching reading. This study aimed to detect the cut-off point of this test for good readers and dyslexics.
Methods: The test has 4 parts including: objects, colors, numbers and letters. 5 items are repeated on cards randomly for 10 times. Children were asked to name items rapidly. We studied 18 dyslexic students and 18 age-matched good readers between 7 and 8 years of age at second and third grades of elementary school; they were recruited by non-randomize sampling into 2 groups: children with developmental dyslexia from learning disabilities centers with mean age of 100 months, and normal children with mean age of 107 months from general schools in Tehran. Good readers selected from the same class of dyslexics.
Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.849 for letter naming, 0.892 for color naming, 0.971 for number naming, 0.887 for picture naming, and 0.965 totally. The overall sensitivity and specificity was 1 and was 0.79, respectively. The highest sensitivity and specificity were related to number naming (1 and 0.90, respectively).
Conclusion: Findings showed that the rapid automized naming test could diagnose good readers from dyslexics appropriately.

References

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Published
2017-07-31
How to Cite
1.
Soleymani Z, Nemati P, Barkhordar A, Baghestani A. Detection of cut-off point for rapid automized naming test in good readers and dyslexics. Aud Vestib Res. 22(4):90-97.
Section
Research Article(s)