The effect of non-linear frequency compression on hearing skills improvement in children with profound hearing loss, using Tavana test

  • Sahar Fattahi Department of Audiology, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Farnoush Jarollahi Mail Department of Audiology, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Jamileh Fattahi Department of Audiology, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran
Keywords:
Frequency compression, detection, determination, recognition, comprehension

Abstract

Background and Aim: Non-linear frequency compression is a new feature in hearing instruments compresses the voices of a high-frequency region above a certain cut-off point and transfers them to the lower frequency regions in order to improve the audibility. In this study, we aimed to survey the effect of this feature on the total level of hearing skills of children with profound hearing loss at the age of 3-4 years.
Methods: Twenty two 3-4-years-old children with profound hearing loss were selected with improbable simple sampling. 11 of them had hearing instruments with non-linear frequency compression and 11 had traditional hearing instruments. Tavana test (Jarollahi, 2009) was used to compare the level of hearing skills in these two groups.
Results: Comparison of mean scores of total level of hearing skills in two groups indicated a significant difference (p <0.001). Also, the mean scores of level in all subtests, detection (p=0.022), determination (p=0.005), recognition (p=0.039) and comprehension (p=0.010), showed significant differences.
Conclusion: Using the hearing instruments with non-linear frequency compression would increase the total level of hearing skills in children with profound hearing loss at the ages of 3-4-years and also, in all skill of detection, determination, recognition and comprehension.

References

1. Stelmachowicz PG, Pitman AL, Hoover BM, Lewis DE. Aided perception of /s/ and /z/ by hearing-impaired children. Ear Hear. 2002;23(4):316-24.
2. Byrne D, Dillon H, Tran K, Arlinger S, Wilbraham K, Cox K, et al. An international comparison of long term average speech spectra. J Acoust Soc Am. 1994;96(4):2108-20.
3. McDermott HJ, Dean MR, Dillon H. Control of hearing aid saturated sound pressure level by frequency-shaped output compression limiting. Scaned Audiol. 1999;28(1):27-38.
4. Simpson A, Hersbach AA. McDermott HJ. Improvements in speech perception with an experimental nonlinear frequency compression hearing devices. Int J Audiol. 2005;44(5):281-92.
5. Hawkins DB, Cook JA. Hearing aid software predictive gain values: How accurate are they? Hearing Journal. 2003;56(7):26-34.
6. Moeller MP, Hoover B, Putman C, Arbataitis K., Bohnenkamp G, Peterson B, et al. Vocalizations of infants with hearing loss compared with infants with normal hearing: Part II-transition to words. Ear Hear. 2007;28(5):628-42.
7. Scollie S, Glista D, Bagatto M, Seewald R. Multichannel nonlinear frequency compression: a new technology for children with hearing loss. In: Seewald R, Bamford JM. A sound foundation through early amplification. Phonak AG; 2010. p. 151-9.
8. Nyffeler M. Study finds that non-linear frequency compression boosts speech intelligibility. The Hearing J. 2008;61(12):22,24,26.
9. Glista D, Scollie S, Bagatto M, Seewald R, Parsa V, Johnson A. Evaluation of nonlinear frequency compression: clinical outcomes. Int J Audiol. 2009;48(9):632-44.
10. Nyffeler M. Evidence of improvement in speech intelligibility in noise. Zeitschrift fur Audilogie. 2010;38:86-95.
11. Jarollahi F, Modarresi Y, Keyhani MR. Content validity of Tavana: a test for evaluation of auditory skills of 3-4 year-old hearing-impaired Persian children. Audiol. 2010:19(1):11-22. Persian.
Published
2017-07-31
How to Cite
1.
Fattahi S, Jarollahi F, Fattahi J. The effect of non-linear frequency compression on hearing skills improvement in children with profound hearing loss, using Tavana test. Aud Vestib Res. 23(1):79-86.
Section
Research Article(s)