Comparison of click and CE-chirp-evoked human auditory brainstem responses: a preliminary study

  • Vida Khorsand Sabet Department of Audiology, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mohammad-Ebrahim Mahdavi-Zafarghandi Mail Department of Audiology, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mozhdeh Safavi Department of Audiology, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Marzieh Sharifian Department of Audiology, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Seyyed Mahdi Tabatabaee Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords:
Auditory brainstem responses, chirp, click, normal hearing

Abstract

Background and Aim: CE-Chirp stimulus has been developed for stimulating more apical regions of the cochlea. Inadequacy of clinical information on the latency and amplitude characteristics of ABR evoked by CE-chirp at different levels in addition to discrepancy in identifying earlier ABR waveforms using CE-chirp stimulus are the reasons of this study.
Methods: This study was done by recoding ABR to click and broad-band CE-chirp stimuli in the right ear of 15 non-randomly selected normal-hearing individuals with age range of 20-30 years old. Frequency of recordable waves I and III, as well as threshold, amplitude, and latency of wave V were compared in response to click and CE-Chirp at 20-80 dB nHL.
Results: At 80 dB nHL, click stimulus evokes waves I and III more frequently than chirp stimulus (p=0.012 and p=0.016 respectively). At 20 and 40 dB nHL, wave V latency evoked by CE-Chirp is significantly longer than wave V latency evoked by click (p=0.012 and p=0.0001 respectively); however, at 80 dB nHL wave V latency evoked by CE-Chirp is shorter than click (p=0.0001). Wave V amplitude for CE-Chirp is significantly larger than for click at levels of 20, 40 and 60 dB nHL (p=0.0001, p=0.0001 and p=0.013 respectively). Wave V threshold is approximately 5 dB lower with CE-chirp compared to click (p=0.014).
Conclusion: Except at high levels, CE-Chirp evokes wave V with larger amplitude and lower threshold than click. Possibility of recording earlier ABR waves is reduced with CE-chirp stimulus.

References

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Published
2017-07-31
How to Cite
1.
Khorsand Sabet V, Mahdavi-Zafarghandi M-E, Safavi M, Sharifian M, Tabatabaee SM. Comparison of click and CE-chirp-evoked human auditory brainstem responses: a preliminary study. Aud Vestib Res. 23(4):69-76.
Section
Research Article(s)